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A Clockwork Orange Critical Analysis Essay

Essay on Analysis Of Clockwork Orange

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Analysis of Clockwork Orange

     The film, “A Clockwork Orange,” is, to me, an almost exact replica of today’s society. Basically, one kid, who seems to have come from a financially sound home and community, goes through about three stages--1. He violates the laws society has set forth to maintain order. 2. He is caught and punished for his crimes against society. 3. He feels remorse for his violence and sexually deviance (although, at the end of the film, he’s back to his old, delinquent self).
     The main character, Alex, is shown as a typical juvenile offender. He is shown in such a comparable manner not because all juvenile offenders are out robbing, rapping, and murdering people…show more content…

For example, I picked on a lot of other kids because I was in the “cool” crowd. I know now that what I did was wrong, but even to this day I can be excited by others and do things that I wouldn’t normally do by myself.
     The neighborhood in which the crimes Alex and his social group were committing seemed very nice. People were skeptical after dark, but still were trustworthy enough to offer assistance when Alex told them he was in a terrible accident. The houses were beautiful, and the area seemed to have a low crime rate. Out in California there have been rich kids who go around killing, or raping people, and they have world of opportunities ahead of them, they just choose a different path.
     In jail, Alex was beaten by the guards. This often happens in our jails here in America. If you disrespect the guards, you’re in big trouble. If you don’t disrespect the guards, you could still be in big trouble. Alex was given a chance to get off with a lighter sentence if he was a participant in an experiment to rehabilitate him. This is a perfect example of differential association, which is the process of social interaction by which definitions favorable and unfavorable to deviation are taught and learned.
     The gist of the

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Anthony Burgess was born 100 years ago today. In this tribute from 2014, Trainspotting author Irvine Welsh explains why Burgess's A Clockwork Orange is a classic

Few writers, whatever the claims made for them by literary critics, ever manage to spawn big cultural moments. One who genuinely did so was Anthony Burgess, with his novel A Clockwork Orange. And, as novelists are often contrary by nature, he was highly ambivalent about this state of affairs. Burgess would disparagingly refer to the book, published in 1962, as a “novella”, regarding it as an inconsequential sliver of his Brobdingnagian canon. He blamed (and there’s really no other term for it) the book’s resonance on the Stanley Kubrick film adaptation, which appeared nine years later.

My generation was obsessed with this stylistic, inventive affair, a movie that spurned both mainstream Hollywood concerns and European art house affectations to stake out a unique terrain for British independent cinema. Kubrick’s movie was an influence on the Ziggy-era David Bowie, and it was those cool credentials that made me backtrack to the film, which I first saw at a late-night screening several years after its release. As is generally the way of those things, far fewer of us had enjoyed any exposure to the novel. As a writer who has had many of his own books adapted for screen, I’m a little uncomfortable at conceding that I was in this camp.

I can recall my father giving me a copy of A Clockwork Orange in my early twenties. Like myself, he had liked the film, but informed me that the book was superior, thus acknowledging, I think, Burgess’s genius as the source of that great phenomenon.

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