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Uscg Cdr Assignment Panel Board

07 MAR 18

UNCLAS //N01301//
ALCGPSC 039/18
SUBJ: ASSIGNMENT YEAR 2018 (AY18) RESERVE COMMANDER ASSIGNMENT PANEL RESULTS
A. COMCOGARD PSC Washington DC / ALCGRSV 034/17
B. RESERVE POLICY MANUAL, CONDTINST M1001.28C
1. The AY18 Reserve Commander Assignment Panel convened 7 March 2018 per
REF A. The following slate for commanders assigned to Selected Reserve
(SELRES) billets has been developed. Assignment orders will be issued
after the retirement-in-lieu-of-orders (RILO) period concludes and all
final changes are made to the below slate. Final Panel decisions will be
announced via ALCGPSC in late March 2018, with orders taking effect by
1 October 2018.
Unit                        Posn No.    Rank    Selectee
PSU 309 COMMAND STAFF     00045711 CDR  Aaron Wallace
PSU 308 COMMAND STAFF     00053188 CDR Gennaro Ruocco
CGRU USSOUTHCOM      00052271 CDR Paul Rooney
CGRU USPACOM      00072034 CDR Jeffrey Engel
CGRU USNORTHCOM      00053006 CDR Michael Vaughn
CGRU JTRU USTRANSCOM     00049122 CDR (s) Thomas Adams (FR)
CGRU USNORTHCOM      00053231 CDR (s) Rebecca Albert (FR)
CGRU USNORTHCOM      00053231 CDR (s) Christopher Anderson (FR)
CGRU USSOUTHCOM      00070918 CDR (s) Brett Chianella (FR)
CGRU USSOUTHCOM      00070918 CDR  Nan Silverman-Wise
DDE-CGRU JOINT STAFF SOUTH  00049761    CDR  John Rhodes
DDE-CGRU JOINT STAFF SOUTH  00052270    CDR  Georgios Sekeroglou
DDE-CGRU JOINT STAFF SOUTH  00074437    CDR (s) Christopher Bruno (FR)
DDE-NMCC PENTAGON WASH DC   00070953    CDR Kevin Wallace
CGRU JTRU USTRANSCOM     00050229 CDR  Ann McSpadden
CGRU JTRU USTRANSCOM     00049796 CDR (s) Anthony Franzago (FR)
CGRU JTRU USTRANSCOM     00049795 CDR Becky Jones
CGRU JTRU USTRANSCOM     00049179 CDR (s) Michael Stanley (FR)
CGRU JTRU USTRANSCOM     00049179 CDR John Higham
CGRU JTRU USTRANSCOM     00049165 CDR  Christopher Phelan
CGRU JTRU USTRANSCOM     00049165 CDR (s) Michael VonStein (FR)
DDE-CORIVRON 8      00051340 CDR Christopher O'Halloran
DDE-CORIVGRU 1      00052160 CDR John Jacob
DDE-CORIVRON 1      00052283 CDR  Karl Hansen
SEC JCKSNVILLE CMD CADRE    00042884 CDR Robert Bisang
SEC N NEW ENG CMD CADRE     00042884 CDR Frank Stapleton
SEC PUGET SND CMD CADRE     00052088 CDR Sara Platt-Moser
SEC SAN DIEGO CMD CADRE     00050839 CDR John Mower
SEC OHIO VALLEY CMD CADRE   00043386 CDR  Neal Kite
SEC COL RIVER CMD CADRE     00045553 CDR Mark Freymuth (EXT)
SEC BUFFALO CMD CADRE     00050276 CDR (s) Robyn Swan (FR)
SEC SS MARIE CMD CADRE     00050556 CDR Charles Wilcox
SEC HONOLULU CMD CADRE     00052035 CDR  Gregory Duncan
BASE MIAMI BEACH     00050696 CDR (s) Regina Adams (FR)
BASE SEATTLE      00052108 CDR (s) Nikolas Anderson (FR)
BASE ALAMEDA      00050249 CDR  Patrick Grace
BASE PORTSMOUTH      00045966 CDR Kimberly Guedry
BASE HONOLULU      00052009 CDR Oscar Rojas
MIFC PAC      00050906 CDR (s) Christopher Waugh (FR)
SEC PUGET SND RESPONSE DEPT 00042600    CDR (s) Molly Hayes (FR)
SEC COL RIVER RESPONSE DEPT 00043948 CDR (s) Jeffrey Thomason (FR)
SEC N NEW ENG CP/RDNS STF   00052963 CDR  Keirsten Current
D1 INCIDENT MGMT BR (DRM)   00045030 CDR  Patrick Petrarca
D1 INCIDENT MGMT BR (DRM)   00045551 CDR (s) Michael Dimeo (FR)
D5 PLNG & FORCE RDNS (DX)   00070934 CDR Dale McFarland
D8 PLNG & FORCE RDNS (DX)   00070932 CDR  Jared Angelle
D11 INCIDENT MGMT BR (DRM)  00070933 CDR Teresa Peace
D13 PLNG & FORCE RDNS (DX)  00070935 CDR Jeannette Peters
D14 PLNG & FORCE RDNS (DX)  00046854 CDR Jennifer Conklin
CG LSC COMMAND STAFF     00044316 CDR Gerald Thornton
D1 LEGAL STAFF (DL)     00045080 CDR Ronald Seely
D7 LEGAL STAFF (DL)     00053004 CDR Diane Croff
D8 LEGAL STAFF (DL)     00042735 CDR Christine Hodzic
COMMANDANT (CG-LPD)     00042496    CDR Lineka Quijano
LANTAREA (35)      00049069 CDR (s) Alessandra Penswater (FR)
LANTAREA (57)      00049919 CDR (s) Michael Bowman (FR)
PACAREA (35)      00051473 CDR (s) Dominik Schmidt (FR)
FACILITIES DESIGN & CONST   00047119 CDR Theresa Fasceski
2. Officers marked with (FR) will be frocked to the grade of commander upon
departure from their current duty station, if not already promoted.
3. Officers marked with (EXT) will be extended in their current billet for one year
unless otherwise noted. All tour lengths will be per REF B unless indicated
otherwise in parenthesis following the name of the officer.
4. The panel has recessed for the duration of the RILO period. Serious objections
to proposed assignments should be sent by e-mail to RADM Pelkowski at
Francis.S.Pelkowski(at)uscg.mil. Please copy your chain of command, CAPT Hanley,
Robert.T.Hanley(at)uscg.mil, and CDR Fryar, Troy.E.Fryar(at)uscg.mil on
the email.
5. This message constitutes notification for requests for voluntary RILO.
Officers listed in paragraph 1 have one of three choices to make: execute
orders to the slated position, request retirement, or decline orders and be
transferred to the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR) or the Inactive Status List
(ISL) in accordance with REF B. Retirement requests must be received by CG
PSC-RPM prior to 21 March 2018. Members who intend not to execute the assignment
listed in paragraph 1, shall notify CDR Troy Fryar by email at:
Troy.E.Fryar@uscg.mil or via phone at: (202)795-6501 by 21 March 2018.
Effective date of transfers to the IRR or ISL will be 1 October 2018.
6. The target date to release commander PCS orders will be no later than
30 May 2018.
7. Assignment Panel members:
Name                            Unit
RADM F. S. Pelkowski, USCGR CG DCO SRO
CAPT M. W. Wampler, USCGR DDE-PAC-01-BEIJING
CAPT D. W. Clark, USCGR  PACAREA (37)
CAPT M. J. Ferullo, USCGR LANTAREA (39)
CAPT J. I. Lumpkin, USCGR CGRU JTRU USTRANSCOM
8. RADM F. S. Pelkowski, Panel President, sends.
9. Internet release authorized.

United States Coast Guard

Emblem of the United States Coast Guard

FoundedJanuary 28, 1915; 103 years ago (1915-01-28)[1][Note 1]
Country United States of America
TypeCoast guard
RoleDefense operations, maritime law enforcement, and search and rescue
Size40,992 active personnel[2]
7,000 reserve personnel[2]
8,577 civilian personnel[2]
Part ofDepartment of Homeland Security
HeadquartersDouglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters Building, Washington, D.C., U.S.
Nickname(s)"Coasties",[3] "Shallow water sailors",[3] "The Guard",[3]
Motto(s)Semper Paratus (English: Always ready)
ColorsCG Red, CG Blue, White[4]
              
March"Semper Paratus"  Play (help·info)
Anniversaries4 August
Engagements
Decorations
Commanders
Commander-in-ChiefPresidentDonald Trump
Secretary of Homeland SecurityKirstjen Nielsen
CommandantADMPaul F. Zukunft
Vice CommandantADM Charles D. Michel
Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast GuardMCPOCG Steven W. Cantrell
Insignia
Standard
Ensign
Seal
Mark
Guidon
Pennant

The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is a branch of the United States Armed Forces[6] and one of the country's seven uniformed services. The Coast Guard is a maritime, military, multi-mission service unique among the U.S. military branches for having a maritime law enforcement mission (with jurisdiction in both domestic and international waters) and a federalregulatory agency mission as part of its mission set. It operates under the U.S. Department of Homeland Security during peacetime, and can be transferred to the U.S. Department of the Navy by the U.S. President at any time, or by the U.S. Congress during times of war. This has happened twice, in 1917, during World War I, and in 1941, during World War II.[7][8]

Created by Congress on 4 August 1790 at the request of Alexander Hamilton as the Revenue Marine, it is the oldest continuous seagoing service of the United States.[Note 2] As Secretary of the Treasury, Hamilton headed the Revenue Marine, whose original purpose was collecting customs duties in the nation's seaports. By the 1860s, the service was known as the U.S. Revenue Cutter Service and the term Revenue Marine gradually fell into disuse.[9]

The modern Coast Guard was formed by a merger of the Revenue Cutter Service and the U.S. Life-Saving Service on 28 January 1915, under the U.S. Department of the Treasury. As one of the country's five armed services, the Coast Guard has been involved in every U.S. war from 1790 to the Iraq War[10] and the War in Afghanistan.[11] As of 2014[update], the Coast Guard had over 36,000 men and women on active duty, 7,350 reservists, 29,620 auxiliarists, and 7,064 full-time civilian employees.[12] In terms of size, while the U.S. Coast Guard is the smallest of the military service branches, by itself is the world's 12th largest naval force.[13][14]

The Coast Guard's legal authority differs from the other four armed services, as it operates simultaneously under Title 10 of the U.S. Code and its other organic authorities, such as Titles 6, 14, 19, 33, and 46. Because of its legal authority, the Coast Guard can conduct military operations under the U.S. Department of Defense or directly for the President in accordance with Title 14 USC 1–3. The Coast Guard's enduring roles are maritime safety, security, and stewardship. To carry out those roles, it has 11 statutory missions as defined in 6 U.S.C. § 468, which include enforcing U.S. law in the world's largest exclusive economic zone of 3.4 million square miles (8,800,000 km2).[15] The Coast Guard's motto Semper Paratus means Always ready in Latin.

Mission[edit]

Main article: Missions of the United States Coast Guard

Role[edit]

The Coast Guard has roles in maritime homeland security, maritime law enforcement (MLE), search and rescue (SAR), marine environmental protection (MEP), the maintenance of river, intracoastal and offshore aids to navigation (ATON).

With a decentralized organization and much responsibility placed on even the most junior personnel, the Coast Guard is frequently lauded for its quick responsiveness and adaptability in a broad range of emergencies. In a 2005 article in Time magazine following Hurricane Katrina, the author wrote, "the Coast Guard's most valuable contribution to [a military effort when catastrophe hits] may be as a model of flexibility, and most of all, spirit." Wil Milam, a rescue swimmer from Alaska told the magazine, "In the Navy, it was all about the mission. Practicing for war, training for war. In the Coast Guard, it was, take care of our people and the mission will take care of itself."[16]

Missions[edit]

The Coast Guard carries out three basic roles, which are further subdivided into eleven statutory missions. The three roles are:

The eleven statutory missions as defined by law are divided into homeland security missions and non-homeland security missions:[17]

Non-homeland security missions[edit]

Homeland security missions[edit]

Search and Rescue[edit]

See National Search and Rescue Committee[18]
See Joint Rescue Coordination Centers

While the U. S. Coast Guard Search and Rescue (CG-SAR)[1] is not the oldest search and rescue organization in the world it is one of the Coast Guard's best-known operations. The National Search and Rescue Plan[19] designates the Coast Guard as the federal agency responsible for maritime SAR operations, and the United States Air Force as the federal agency responsible for inland SAR. Both agencies maintain rescue coordination centers to coordinate this effort, and have responsibility for both military and civilian search and rescue.[20] The two services jointly provide instructor staff for the National Search and Rescue School that trains SAR mission planners and coordinators. Previously located on Governors Island, New York, the school is now located at Coast Guard Training Center Yorktown at Yorktown, Virginia.

National Response Center[edit]

Operated by the Coast Guard, the National Response Center (NRC) is the sole U.S. Government point of contact for reporting all oil, chemical, radiological, biological, and etiologicalspills into the environment anywhere in the United States and its territories.[21] In addition to gathering and distributing spill/incident information for Federal On Scene Coordinators and serving as the communications and operations center for the National Response Team, the NRC maintains agreements with a variety of federal entities to make additional notifications regarding incidents meeting established trigger criteria. The NRC also takes Maritime Suspicious Activity and Security Breach Reports. Details on the NRC organization and specific responsibilities can be found in the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan.[22]The Marine Information for Safety and Law Enforcement (MISLE) database system is managed and used by the Coast Guard for tracking pollution and safety incidents in the nation's ports.

Authority as an armed service[edit]

The five uniformed services that make up the U.S. Armed Forces are defined in Title 10 of the U.S. Code:

The term "armed forces" means the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard.[23]

The Coast Guard is further defined by Title 14 of the United States Code:

The Coast Guard as established January 28, 1915, shall be a military service and a branch of the armed forces of the United States at all times. The Coast Guard shall be a service in the Department of Homeland Security, except when operating as a service in the Navy.[24]

Coast Guard organization and operation is as set forth in Title 33 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

On 25 November 2002, the Homeland Security Act was signed into law by U.S. President George W. Bush, designating the Coast Guard to be placed under the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The transfer of administrative control from the U.S. Department of Transportation to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security was completed the following year, on 1 March 2003.[25][26][27]

The U.S. Coast Guard reports directly to the Secretary of Homeland Security. However, under 14 U.S.C. § 3 as amended by section 211 of the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2006, upon the declaration of war and when Congress so directs in the declaration, or when the President directs, the Coast Guard operates under the Department of Defense as a service in the Department of the Navy.

As members of the military, Coast Guardsmen on active and reserve service are subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice and receive the same pay and allowances as members of the same pay grades in the other uniformed services.

The service has participated in every major U.S. conflict from 1790 through today, including landing troops on D-Day and on the Pacific Islands in World War II, in extensive patrols and shore bombardment during the Vietnam War, and multiple roles in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Maritime interception operations, coastal security, transportation security, and law enforcement detachments have been its major roles in recent conflicts in Iraq.

On 17 October 2007, the Coast Guard joined with the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps to adopt a new maritime strategy called A Cooperative Strategy for 21st Century Seapower that raised the notion of prevention of war to the same philosophical level as the conduct of war.[28] This new strategy charted a course for the Navy, Coast Guard and Marine Corps to work collectively with each other and international partners to prevent regional crises, man-made or natural, from occurring, or reacting quickly should one occur to avoid negative impacts to the United States. During the launch of the new U.S. maritime strategy at the International Seapower Symposium at the U.S. Naval War College in 2007, Coast Guard Commandant Admiral Thad Allen said the new maritime strategy reinforced the time-honored missions the service has carried out in the United States since 1790. "It reinforces the Coast Guard maritime strategy of safety, security and stewardship, and it reflects not only the global reach of our maritime services but the need to integrate and synchronize and act with our coalition and international partners to not only win wars ... but to prevent wars," Allen said.[28]

Authority as a law enforcement agency[edit]

Title 14 USC, section 2 authorizes the Coast Guard to enforce U.S. federal laws.[29] This authority is further defined in 14 U.S.C. § 89, which gives law enforcement powers to all Coast Guard commissioned officers, warrant officers, and petty officers.[30] Unlike the other branches of the United States Armed Forces, which are prevented from acting in a law enforcement capacity by 18 U.S.C. § 1385, the Posse Comitatus Act, and Department of Defense policy, the Coast Guard is exempt from and not subject to the restrictions of the Posse Comitatus Act.[31]

Further law enforcement authority is given by 14 U.S.C. § 143 and 9 U.S.C. § 1401, which empower U.S. Coast Guard active and reserve commissioned officers, warrant officers, and petty officers as federal customs officers.[32][33] This places them under 19 U.S.C. § 1589a, which grants customs officers general federal law enforcement authority, including the authority to:

(1) carry a firearm;
(2) execute and serve any order, warrant, subpoena, summons, or other process issued under the authority of the United States;
(3) make an arrest without a warrant for any offense against the United States committed in the officer's presence or for a felony, cognizable under the laws of the United States committed outside the officer's presence if the officer has reasonable grounds to believe that the person to be arrested has committed or is committing a felony; and
(4) perform any other law enforcement duty that the Secretary of Homeland Security may designate.

— 19 USC §1589a. Enforcement authority of customs officers[34]

The U.S. Government Accountability Office Report to the House of Representatives, Committee on the Judiciary on its 2006 Survey of Federal Civilian Law Enforcement Functions and Authorities, identified the Coast Guard as one of 104 federal components that employed law enforcement officers.[35] The report also included a summary table of the authorities of the Coast Guard's 192 special agents and 3,780 maritime law enforcement boarding officers.[36]

Coast Guardsmen have the legal authority to carry their service-issued firearms on and off base. This is rarely done in practice, however; at many Coast Guard stations, commanders prefer to have all service-issued weapons in armories when not in use. Still, one court has held that Coast Guard boarding officers are qualified law enforcement officers authorized to carry personal firearms off-duty for self-defense.[37]

History[edit]

Main article: History of the United States Coast Guard

The Coast Guard traced its roots to the small fleet of vessels maintained by the United States Department of the Treasury beginning in the 1790s to enforce tariffs (an important source of revenue for the new nation), which eventually evolved into the United States Revenue Cutter Service. Secretary of the TreasuryAlexander Hamilton lobbied Congress to fund the construction of ten cutters, which it did on 4 August 1790 (now celebrated as the Coast Guard's official birthday). Until the re-establishment of the Navy in 1798, these "revenue cutters" were the only naval force of the early United States. As such, the cutters and their crews frequently took on additional duties, including combating piracy, rescuing mariners in distress, ferrying government officials, and even carrying mail.[39]

"First Fleet" is a term occasionally used as an informal reference to the Coast Guard, although there is no indication that the United States has ever officially used this designation with reference either to the Coast Guard or any element of the Navy. The informal appellation honors the fact that between 1790 and 1798, there was no United States Navy and the cutters that were the predecessors of the Coast Guard were the only warships protecting the coast, trade, and maritime interests of the new republic.[40]

The modern Coast Guard was created in 1915, when the Revenue Cutter Service merged with the U.S. Life-Saving Service.[41] In 1939, the Lighthouse Service was brought under the Coast Guard's purview. In 1942, the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation was transferred to the Coast Guard.[42] In 1967, the Coast Guard moved from the U.S. Department of the Treasury to the newly formed U.S. Department of Transportation, an arrangement that lasted until it was placed under the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in 2003 as part of legislation designed to more efficiently protect American interests following the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001.

In times of war, the Coast Guard or individual components of it can operate as a service of the Department of the Navy. This arrangement has a broad historical basis, as the Coast Guard has been involved in wars as diverse as the War of 1812, the Mexican–American War, and the American Civil War, in which the cutter Harriet Lane fired the first naval shots attempting to relieve besieged Fort Sumter. The last time the Coast Guard operated as a whole within the Navy was in World War II. More often, military and combat units within the Coast Guard will operate under Navy or joint operational control while other Coast Guard units will remain under the Department of Homeland Security.

Organization[edit]

Main article: Organization of the United States Coast Guard

The new Department of Homeland Security headquarters complex is on the grounds of the former St. Elizabeths Hospital in the Anacostia section of Southeast Washington, across the Anacostia River from former Coast Guard headquarters.[43]

The fiscal year 2016 budget request for the US Coast Guard was $9.96 billion.[44]

Shore establishments[edit]

Shore establishment commands exist to support and facilitate the mission of the sea and air assets. U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters is located in Southeast Washington, DC. Other shore establishments are Coast Guard Sectors (which may include Coast Guard Bases), Coast Guard Stations, Coast Guard Air Stations, and the United States Coast Guard Yard. Training centers include the United States Coast Guard Academy, Training Center Petaluma, Training Center Cape May, Coast Guard Aviation Technical Training Center, Coast Guard Aviation Training Center Mobile, and Training Center Yorktown.

Personnel[edit]

The formal name for a uniformed member of the Coast Guard is "Coast Guardsman", irrespective of gender. "Coastie" is an informal term commonly used to refer to current or former Coast Guard personnel. In 2008, the term "Guardian" was introduced as an alternative but was later dropped. Admiral Robert J. Papp, Jr. stated that it was his belief that no Commandant had the authority to change what members of the Coast Guard are called as the term Coast Guardsman is found in Title 14 USC which established the Coast Guard in 1915.[45][Note 3] "Team Coast Guard" refers to the four components of the Coast Guard as a whole: Regular, Reserve, Auxiliary, and Coast Guard civilian employees.

Commissioned officers[edit]

Commissioned officers in the Coast Guard hold pay grades ranging from O-1 to O-10 and have the same rank structure as the Navy.[47][48] Officers holding the rank of ensign (O-1) through lieutenant commander (O-4) are considered junior officers, commanders (O-5) and captains (O-6) are considered senior officers, and rear admirals (O-7) through admirals (O-10) are considered flag officers. The Commandant of the Coast Guard and the Vice Commandant of the Coast Guard are the only members of the Coast Guard authorized to hold the rank of admiral.[49]

The Coast Guard does not have medical officers or chaplains of its own. Instead, chaplains from the U.S. Navy, as well as officers from the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps are assigned to the Coast Guard to perform chaplain-related functions and medical-related functions, respectively. These officers wear Coast Guard uniforms but replace the Coast Guard insignia with that of their own service.[50]

The Navy and Coast Guard share identical officer rank insignia, except that Coast Guard officers wear a gold Coast Guard Shield in lieu of a line star or staff corps officer insignia.

Warrant officers[edit]

Highly qualified enlisted personnel in pay grades E-6 through E-9 with a minimum of eight years experience can compete each year for appointment as warrant officers (WO). Successful candidates are chosen by a board and then commissioned as chief warrant officers (CWO-2) in one of sixteen specialties. Over time, chief warrant officers may be promoted to CWO-3 and CWO-4. The ranks of warrant officer (WO-1) and chief warrant officer (CWO-5) are not currently used in the Coast Guard. Chief warrant officers may also compete for the Chief Warrant Officer to Lieutenant Program. If selected, the warrant officer will be promoted to lieutenant (O-3E). The "E" designates over four years active duty service as a warrant officer or enlisted member and entitles the member to a higher rate of pay than other lieutenants.

Warrant Officer grade structure of the United States Coast Guard
Chief Warrant Officer 2Chief Warrant Officer 3Chief Warrant Officer 4
W-2W-3W-4

Enlisted personnel[edit]

Enlisted members of the Coast Guard have pay grades from E-1 to E-9 and also follow the same rank structure as the Navy. Enlisted members in pay grades of E-4 and higher are considered petty officers and follow career development paths very similar to those of Navy petty officers.

Petty officers in pay grade E-7 and higher are chief petty officers and must attend the Coast Guard Chief Petty Officer Academy, or an equivalent Department of Defense school, in order to be advanced to pay grade E-8. The basic themes of the school are:

  • Professionalism
  • Leadership
  • Communications
  • Systems thinking and lifelong learning

Enlisted rank insignia is also nearly identical to Navy enlisted insignia. The Coast Guard shield replacing the petty officer's eagle on collar and cap devices for petty officers or enlisted rating insignia for seamen qualified as a "designated striker". Group Rate marks (stripes) for junior enlisted members (E-3 and below) also follow Navy convention with white for seaman, red for fireman, and green for the airman. In a departure from the Navy conventions, all petty officers E-6 and below wear red chevrons and all chief petty officers wear gold

A boatswain's mate watches from the side port door as Coast Guard Cutter Bertholf's Over-The-Horizon small boat departs to receive personnel from Coast Guard Cutter Chandeleur in 2008.
Search and Rescue Program Logo of the United States Coast Guard.
A member of USCG Law Enforcement Detachment (LEDET) 106 performs a security sweep aboard a tanker ship in the North Persian Gulf in July 2007.
Marine Corps Privates First Class William A. McCoy and Ralph L. Plunkett holding a sign thanking the Coast Guard after the Battle of Guam in 1944.[38]
United States Coast Guard Squadron One unit patch of the Vietnam War era
Douglas A. Munro Coast Guard Headquarters Building in St. Elizabeths West Campus.

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